4 Reasons File Integrity Monitoring is Important for Enterprises

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The data businesses create, share, and store is often the key to their success. Some even believe the information businesses posses is the most valuable resource they could possibly have—they likely aren’t wrong. As Bernard Marr recently reported on big data, two of the three big data concerns involve privacy and security.

Organizations continue to put an incredible amount of effort and money towards securing their data. Along with larger responsibilities for CISOs and IT security staff, tools, and software used within organizations are playing an increasingly important role. Not sure if your business is at a point where you need additional software to help monitor files? Here’s 4 reasons why file integrity monitoring (FIM) software is important for enterprise-level organizations.

To Control Data

One of the most fundamental benefits provided by file integrity monitoring software is the ability to control and protect your data how you choose. With the right software you are able to manage permissions for various user groups within an organization. For example, the marketing department may not need access to files and folders created and managed by the finance department, and vise-versa, making it easier to ensure that employees are only accessing the information that they need.

When coupling FIM software with intrusion detection software, you’re adding yet another layer of control and security around your data.

To Spot the Source of Human Error

Accidents happen. It isn’t uncommon for people to make mistakes in handling digital files. However, the greater issue isn’t that mistakes happen, it’s that they can go undetected until the issue has caused irreparable damage to your organization. As noted by Verizon in the 2016 DBIR, an inside data breach—whether intentional or not—takes the longest to discover.

FIM software gives you the ability to spot where errors are occurring. As long as you are actively monitoring those files, you can see who is the cause and when exactly they occurred.

...And To Remediate Those Errors

Not all monitoring software has the ability to fix mistakes, but some can actually store incremental backups or snapshots of monitored files, giving you the ability to revert changes to those backups and snapshots.

To Identify the Source of Attacks

Not only can the right FIM software help you spot the source of errors, it can help you identify the source of an attack too. There has been no shortage of malicious attacks from hackers and cyber criminals on corporations over the past few years and enterprises need to protect themselves from threats.

And, if you’re monitoring files and depending heavily on the software you use, you may have the ability to obtain information surrounding:

  • Event Date and Time
  • Source IP Address
  • Process Used in Attack
  • Content Modified

To Become Compliant

Many businesses are feeling the effects of the growing number of regulations and their reach. Some of the most common regulations that businesses need to dedicate time, energy, and money towards surround customer information, financial records, and can even pertain to social responsibility and quality.

Not only does file integrity management software help you remain compliant, but some common standards, like Payment Card Industry–Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), also require you to have a FIM software in place in order to be considered compliant.

Automate Records & Reports To Stay Compliant

Finally, some FIM software enables you to automatically create records and reports helping to protect your business in case of external audits. While having the software in place and monitoring your systems and files might be enough for you to meet regulatory standards, automated reporting is a feature that can help you remain compliant.

Interested in learning more about file integrity management? Download your free copy of The Definitive Guide to File Integrity Monitoring!

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Jacqueline von Ogden

Since 1999, Jacqueline has written for corporate communications, MarCom agencies, higher education, and worked within the pharmacy, steel and retail industries. Since joining the tech industry, she has found her "home".